“The Greatest Photo Taker”: Remembering Jack Bradley Part 2–Webster Hall 1960

After Jack Bradley passed away at the age of 87 on March 21, 2021, we knew we had to commemorate his life and friendship with Louis Armstrong on our “That’s My Home” site. Almost immediately, we realized this would be a multi-part series. If you’d like to catch-up, here is the link to Part 1,Continue reading ““The Greatest Photo Taker”: Remembering Jack Bradley Part 2–Webster Hall 1960″

“The Greatest Photo Taker”: Remembering Jack Bradley Part 1–The First Encounters

Jack Bradley passed away on Sunday evening, March 21, 2021. He was 87-years-old. Though not a household name, he was a hero to those who loved Louis Armstrong and especially to us at the Louis Armstrong House Museum. This “That’s My Home” home site and our social media presence would not be what they areContinue reading ““The Greatest Photo Taker”: Remembering Jack Bradley Part 1–The First Encounters”

“My Whole Life, My Whole Soul, My Whole Spirit Is To Blow That Horn”: 50 Years of Louis Armstrong at the Waldorf

50 years ago tonight, on March 1, 1971, Louis Armstrong was a guest on The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carson. Armstrong had appeared on The Tonight Show numerous times over the years but the goal for this appearance was to promote his two-week engagement at the Waldorf-Astoria, commencing on March 2. Armstrong began his appearanceContinue reading ““My Whole Life, My Whole Soul, My Whole Spirit Is To Blow That Horn”: 50 Years of Louis Armstrong at the Waldorf”

“She Just Sends Me All Over”: Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong

On Tuesday, February 23, the Louis Armstrong House Museum will be presenting “Billie + Q&A and Billie + Louis Panel Discussion” in partnership with Greenwich Entertainment, BBC Music and New Black Films. The event will be streaming live at noon EST on our Facebook page and will feature a dynamic panel discussion with Jazzmeia Horn,Continue reading ““She Just Sends Me All Over”: Billie Holiday and Louis Armstrong”

“Solid!” A Celebration of Velma Middleton

60 years ago today, Louis Armstrong’s vocalist Velma Middleton tragically passed away, alone in a Sierra Leone hospital after collapsing on January 14 in the middle of a grueling tour of Africa. She was only in her mid-40s (she publicly gave her birthday as September 1, 1917 but legal documents have turned up with aContinue reading ““Solid!” A Celebration of Velma Middleton”

“Dig Us”: 60 Years of Louis Armstrong at the Sphinx

Louis Armstrong remains one of the most photographed figures of the 20th century. But one single image seems to stand above the rest: Louis and the Great Sphinx of Giza. The image pops all up all the time on the internet, including a beautiful colorized version by Jordan Lloyd of Dynamichrome. But image raises moreContinue reading ““Dig Us”: 60 Years of Louis Armstrong at the Sphinx”

Louis Armstrong and Comedy Part 3: “A Solid Man For Comedy”–Films of the 1930s and Early 40s

After a brief hiatus for the election and to celebrate the anniversary of Louis Armstrong’s trip to the Congo, we’re back with part three of our extended look at Louis Armstrong and Comedy. In Part 1, we examined Armstrong’s earliest and greatest influences, Bert Williams and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, and in Part 2, we demonstratedContinue reading “Louis Armstrong and Comedy Part 3: “A Solid Man For Comedy”–Films of the 1930s and Early 40s”

“Satchmo Charms Congo Cats”: Louis Armstrong and Leopoldville, 60 Years Later

On October 27, 1960, the United Press International reported, “The United Nations Command cracked down Wednesday on unruly troops of Congolese strongman Col. Joseph Mobutu. It ordered the soldiers who have been rampaging through Leopoldville to get out of the capital and back to their barracks by today.” The report added that these soldiers “haveContinue reading ““Satchmo Charms Congo Cats”: Louis Armstrong and Leopoldville, 60 Years Later”

Louis Armstrong and Comedy Part 2: “Always a Showman!” 1922-1933

Last week, we kicked off our multi-part examination of Louis Armstrong and comedy with an in-depth look at Armstrong’s two earliest and greatest comedic influences, Bert Williams and Bill “Bojangles” Robinson. Armstrong saw Robinson at the Erlanger (still named the Palace) in Chicago in late 1922 and had his life changed right then and there.Continue reading “Louis Armstrong and Comedy Part 2: “Always a Showman!” 1922-1933″

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